Why Doesn’t My Website Look Like the Theme I Bought?

Since launching in 2010, Pinterest has rapidly grown to become the go-to source for all Do-It-Yourself projects.

Baking. Crafting. Woodwork. Exercise programs. Hairstyles. Clothing modification. Body modification.  Troll doll modification.

Pinterest has become a never-ending source of things to make.  Pinterest’s CEO refers to it as a “catalog of ideas”.  And while ideas are great, executing those ideas isn’t always as simple as you might think.

Many who have tried their hand at a Pinterest project that sounded incredibly simple have ended up with an unrecognizable end product.

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There are entire websites devoted to Pinterest fails, and for good reason.  Things that sound super simple and easy to do often are not.  This doesn’t just apply to Pinterest.  Small business owners often run into the very same issue when they try to build their own website.

Even if they’re using a pre-made template.

But it’s a pre-made.  What can go wrong?

Templates are super popular, especially on WordPress.  With marketplaces focused solely on selling templates and designers constantly churning new ones out, there’s no shortage of templates for you to buy out there.

There are even quite a few free ones.

So let’s say you go to the template store.  You buy a template that looks perfect.  You follow some instructions about installing a template on a WordPress site.  You turn on the template.  And you end up with something like this….

ugly site

What went wrong?  Where are all of those cool things and pretty pictures on the demo site that you saw?

The thing about many (if not most) templates is that they don’t exactly come pre-assembled.  That demo you saw isn’t just the design files that you downloaded.  It’s the fully assembled, finished product.

It is the model.

You bought the Legos.

Step carefully, folks.

Step carefully, folks.

Some Assembly Required

While themes and templates remove most of the coding aspects of the website building process, there is still work to be done in getting them setup.  Documentation has to be read, instructions have to be followed, and even then, it’s easy to miss something.

To make things more difficult, themes from different companies can be very different in the way they’re settings are configured.  That’s not to say it’s impossible, and it’s certainly a lot easier than attempting to build one from scratch.

For someone with a bit of website know-how, building a templated website just takes some time and effort.  But for someone who’s not web-savvy, they can quickly become frustrating.

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But Custom Websites Take Too Long/Are Too Expensive

Pre-made themes and templates certainly have their advantages.  They’re fast and affordable.  They’re supposed to be a super easy solution to getting you a nice looking website.  But when you hit wall after wall just trying to set the thing up, it defeats the entire purpose.

A theme or template should require little to no work on your end.

What if You Could Have it All Done for You?

Imagine a scenario where you pick a theme, choose some customized options, and have a fully functioning website handed to you in a short window of time for a very affordable price.  Sound too good to be true?

It’s not.

Here at Radiate, we have officially rolled out our own in-house themes.  These themes can have colors, fonts, and pictures customized to match your brand, leaving you with a templated website that still represents your brand.

And we put it together for you to ensure that the finished product looks like the template you chose.

Did we mention it comes with our top-rated hosting, maintenance, and support?  That way, when troubles arise, plugins update, or WordPress changes, you’ll be taken care of.

Soon, we’ll have a gallery available for you to browse the templates we offer.  In the meantime, you can click here to contact us directly and see what we have to offer.

What has your experience been dealing with themes and templates?

Written by Timothy Snyder
on March 4, 2016